Growing Food

How to Grow an Abundance of Arugula!

Arugula blog post
This fast-growing, cool-season salad green (aka “Rocket”) – often ready to harvest as early as 4 weeks after seeding – adds a tangy, peppery or mustard-like flavor to salads and mesclun mixes. It can be incredibly spicy as the temperature warms up, but sweetens as it cools.
 

How to Grow:

Arugula can be planted 4-6 weeks before your last spring frost and 10 weeks before your first fall frost. You can see specific dates for your location using our FREE iOS, Android, and Universal Web App.

Arugula seeds are planted 1/4 inch deep, 4 per square foot, in full sun to part shade. Take care to notice what plants are around the area as well, see the companion plant section below. Arugula seeds will begin to sprout in about 5-7 days with constant moisture.

Companion Plants:

Companion planting is a vital part of organic gardening. Companion plants assist in the growth of others by attracting beneficial insects, repelling pests, or providing nutrients, shade, or support. There are also plants that do not like being next to each other. Some plants get too tall and can provide too much shade for your plant. Sometimes certain plants attract the same pests, so it is important to try and separate these.

         Good Bad
Bush Beans Marjoram Eggplant
Cabbage Mint  
Carrots Nasturtiums  
Cauliflower Onions  
Celery Oregano  
Corn Potatoes  
Cucumbers Radish  
Dill Rosemary  
Lettuce Tarragon  
Marigolds Turnips  

 

See companion plants for 70+ foods in our FREE iOS, Android, and Universal Web app!

Pests:

Pests can be one of the most difficult challenges you face in the garden. We strive to grow food without the use of pesticide and luckily there are natural solutions for most of these nasty pests! The pests listed below are common ones for arugula:

Learn more about how to manage pests and attract beneficial insects in our FREE iOS, Android, and Universal Web App!

Harvesting:

Arugula is ready to harvest within 30-40 days. Harvest the outer leaves of the plant and leave the rest to help keep the plant producing.

Cooking & Eating!

Arugula can be used similarly to spinach. It adds a great flavor to a salad, meat, or pasta!

 

Learn more about growing over 70 different foods, including how to manage various pests in our FREE iOS, Android, or new Universal Web App!

arugula

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